The Ride
The Ride

The ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI) Tri-State Trek raises funds for ALS research and spreads awareness of the work ALS TDI is doing to find an effective treatment and cure for a horrific disease. The Trek began in 2003, when 16 cyclists pedaled from Boston to New York and raised $30,000 for ALS research. The event has since grown to a 270-mile course with over 450 participants and has raised over $8 million.

Year after year, riders return and new faces join the fight. We hope your 2019 summer plans include the Tri-State Trek and look forward to seeing you in June!

The ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI) Tri-State Trek raises funds for ALS research and spreads awareness of the work ALS TDI is doing to find an effective treatment and cure for a horrific disease. The Trek began in 2003, when 16 cyclists pedaled from Boston to New York and raised $30,000 for ALS research. The event has since grown to a 270-mile course with over 450 participants and has raised over $7 million.

Year after year, riders return and new faces join the fight. We hope your 2018 summer plans include the Tri-State Trek and look forward to seeing you in June!

The Ride
Ride Summary

At their own pace, riders cycle a 270-mile marked course with rest stops every 15-20 miles. Starting at Boston College, Chestnut Hill, participants overnight in college dormitories all weekend, and finish with a victory ride down Greenwich Avenue and picnic on the banks of the Long Island Sound. We transport all gear and provide all meals, snacks, water, and sports drinks.

Paticipants can ride, crew, or volunteer at the three-day, fully supported event.

To view all ride options, click here.

About the ALS Therapy Development Institute

The ALS Therapy Development Institute and our scientists actively discover and develop treatments for ALS. We are the world's first and largest nonprofit biotech focused 100 percent on ALS research. Led by people with ALS and drug development experts, we understand the urgent need to slow and stop this disease. Learn more at www.als.net.

Every 90 minutes, someone is diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease or Motor Neuron Disease (MND). It is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease that causes muscle weakness, difficulty breathing and swallowing, and paralysis while leaving the senses intact. ALS attacks certain cells in the brain and spinal cord needed to keep muscles moving. Most people survive two to five years after their diagnosis, with an estimated 30,000 people in the US and 450,000 worldwide living with the disease. Currently, there is no effective treatment nor cure.

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